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12 GST thoughts of Christmas

12 GST thoughts of Christmas:

1. There’s no GST on gifts (so Santa is probably not GST registered).
2. GST registered businesses can claim back the GST on gifts they buy for staff, suppliers and customers.
3. If you buy someone a gift voucher for Christmas it’s quite likely the IRD won’t get any GST until the person redeems it.
4. If the person you gave the voucher to loses it the IRD might never get any GST.
5. On Boxing Day when you go to the shop to return the present you don’t want the retailer will be able to get a refund of GST from the IRD provided they credit you for the return.
6. However, the retailer will have to pay GST if you use the credit to buy something else.
7. The government gets a double whammy of GST when you buy alcohol for your Christmas festivities or petrol for that family road trip (because GST applies to excise taxes on alcohol and fuel).
8. If you order an expensive gift online from overseas for someone in New Zealand and have it delivered directly to them you may be giving them a GST bill because chances are they’ll have to pay GST on the value of the present before they can pick it up from Customs.
9. Businesses are given an automatic extension of time to file their November GST return so they don’t have to file it on 28 December.
10. GST registered businesses with 31 December balance dates which make exempt supplies may have to come back early from their holidays so they can calculate their annual GST adjustment due on 28 January.
11. If you’re booking an overseas holiday and have to take a domestic flight to get to your departure airport it’s best to book both flights together if you want to save the GST on the domestic flight.
12. There’s no GST on gifts but if someone gives you something expensive while overseas you might have to pay GST when you bring it back with you.

Happy Christmas everyone

Iain

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Bodies corporate and GST

Brian Fallow’s opinion piece in today’s Herald on residential bodies corporate and GST is timely.

See here: http://www.nzherald.co.nz/opinion/news/article.cfm?c_id=466&objectid=11231055

This issue baffles me. Why is it so complicated and why is it taking so long for the IRD to reach a settled position?

Maybe I’m missing something, but like Fallow, I think the legal analysis isn’t that complex. Bodies corporate are separate entities from the apartment owners and they provide services to the owners in return for levies. Even if those services are mandated by legislation it seems to me, there is a supply and it is for consideration.

You wouldn’t have to look far to find examples where the IRD has insisted on a company registering for GST because it was supplying goods and services to related shareholders. If no charge was made for the supplies the IRD is entitled to deem consideration to be provided at market value if the shareholder is not GST registered.

This issue isn’t without a downside for the bodies corporate and the apartment owners though. Leaving aside the issue of leaky home settlements (and I agree with Fallow on that), those deriving fees of more than the registration threshold are required to register for GST in my view and that could mean a net GST cost to the owners, especially if the body corporate employs staff.

Our GST system is applauded for being broad based and here we have the IRD arguing for a narrowing of the base. An unusual situation in my view.

Comments most welcome on this one.

Iain

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12 GST thoughts of Christmas

12 GST thoughts of Christmas:

1. There’s no GST on gifts (so Santa is probably not GST registered).
2. GST registered businesses can claim back the GST on gifts they buy for staff, suppliers and customers.
3. If you buy someone a gift voucher for Christmas it’s quite likely the IRD won’t get any GST until the person redeems it.
4. If the person you gave the voucher to loses it the IRD might never get any GST.
5. On Boxing Day when you go to the shop to return the present you don’t want the retailer will be able to get a refund of GST from the IRD provided they credit you for the return.
6. However, the retailer will have to pay GST if you use the credit to buy something else.
7. The government gets a double whammy of GST when you buy alcohol for your Christmas festivities or petrol for that family road trip (because GST applies to excise taxes on alcohol and fuel).
8. If you order an expensive gift online from overseas for someone in New Zealand and have it delivered directly to them you may be giving them a GST bill because chances are they’ll have to pay GST on the value of the present before they can pick it up from Customs.
9. Businesses are given an automatic extension of time to file their November GST return so they don’t have to file it on 28 December.
10. GST registered businesses with 31 December balance dates which make exempt supplies may have to come back early from their holidays so they can calculate their annual GST adjustment due on 28 January.
11. If you’re booking an overseas holiday and have to take a domestic flight to get to your departure airport it’s best to book both flights together if you want to save the GST on the domestic flight.
12. There’s no GST on gifts but if someone gives you something expensive while overseas you might have to pay GST when you bring it back with you.

Happy Christmas everyone

Iain

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GST refund claims: keep it real.

You can’t claim GST back on an expense unless you actually receive whatever it is you are paying for.

That’s the message from the Australian Federal Court in a decision released on 1 November [Professional Admin Service Centres Pty Ltd v FC of T].

In that case the taxpayer agreed to contribute towards a man’s legal costs in return for sharing in any compensation he was awarded if successful. The taxpayer tried to claim the GST back on its payments.

The Court agreed with the Tax Office and refused to allow the GST claim because the taxpayer had no contract with the lawyers and did not actually receive the legal services itself.

The taxpayer had also tried to claim GST back on management fees it was “charged” by a related entity. The Court refused this claim as well because the evidence pointed to the fees being a “sham”. No actual services were provided to the taxpayer and no payment was made by it.

A New Zealand court would probably arrive at the same conclusion.

GST depends a lot on the contractual arrangements entered into by the parties. If goods or services are not actually acquired by the person making the payment it’s unlikely they can claim the GST back on the expense (except in some specific “agency” arrangements).

Much care is required around cost sharing arrangements and charges for “management services”. Make sure the contractual terms are consistent with being able to claim back GST and also make sure what you’re paying for is real!

cheers

Iain

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Penny and Hooper decision carries GST lessons.

The Supreme Court ruled yesterday that orthopaedic surgeons Ian Penny and Gary Hooper avoided tax when they diverted income from their practices to lower tax rate entities such as companies and trusts. A significant issue was the below market salaries they paid themselves.

While it is an income tax case the Penny and Hooper decision is a reminder generally that those operating businesses through closely held entities need to pay careful attention to their tax obligations, including GST.

The Supreme Court found against the taxpayers even though the income tax legislation does not expressly state shareholders must be paid market salaries by the companies they control.

The GST legislation on the other hand does have express provisions requiring market prices to be paid when goods and services are exchanged between related parties. These provisions impact all closely held companies and trading trusts which carry on a GST taxable activity.

A GST registered company or trust which makes any of its property available to shareholders or beneficiaries is probably required to pay GST to Inland Revenue based on the market value of that property.

Similarly, a person providing services to a related Trust or Company may find they have a requirement under the GST legislation to register for GST and charge GST on the market value of the services they provide. Where the Trust or Company does not conduct a GST taxable activity [perhaps they are a residential landlord] this is a permanent GST impost.

It might be stretching the precedential value of the Supreme Court’s decision to claim it sets out principles which apply to GST. Nevertheless, it at least serves as a warning to all closely held trading entities that you need to be just as vigilant in your dealings with related parties under the GST law [and potentially more so] as you do for income tax purposes.

Iain