, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

12 GST thoughts of Christmas

12 GST thoughts of Christmas:

1. There’s no GST on gifts (so Santa is probably not GST registered).
2. GST registered businesses can claim back the GST on gifts they buy for staff, suppliers and customers.
3. If you buy someone a gift voucher for Christmas it’s quite likely the IRD won’t get any GST until the person redeems it.
4. If the person you gave the voucher to loses it the IRD might never get any GST.
5. On Boxing Day when you go to the shop to return the present you don’t want the retailer will be able to get a refund of GST from the IRD provided they credit you for the return.
6. However, the retailer will have to pay GST if you use the credit to buy something else.
7. The government gets a double whammy of GST when you buy alcohol for your Christmas festivities or petrol for that family road trip (because GST applies to excise taxes on alcohol and fuel).
8. If you order an expensive gift online from overseas for someone in New Zealand and have it delivered directly to them you may be giving them a GST bill because chances are they’ll have to pay GST on the value of the present before they can pick it up from Customs.
9. Businesses are given an automatic extension of time to file their November GST return so they don’t have to file it on 28 December.
10. GST registered businesses with 31 December balance dates which make exempt supplies may have to come back early from their holidays so they can calculate their annual GST adjustment due on 28 January.
11. If you’re booking an overseas holiday and have to take a domestic flight to get to your departure airport it’s best to book both flights together if you want to save the GST on the domestic flight.
12. There’s no GST on gifts but if someone gives you something expensive while overseas you might have to pay GST when you bring it back with you.

Happy Christmas everyone

Iain

, , , , , , ,

Visiting sports teams

The recent publicity about AFL players being pinged for income tax as “entertainers” when they played the Anzac Day matches here is interesting. See here:

http://www.3news.co.nz/Wellington-AFL-game-hit-with-tax/tabid/415/articleID/355731/Default.aspx

Like everything in life there’s a GST overtone to this.

The players would have spent money on food, accommodation, transport and other stuff when in New Zealand, all of which would have been subject to GST.

The interesting question is how these players would get on if they sought GST refunds for the costs they incurred here as non-resident “entertainers”. It seems possible under the new GST non-resident registration rules but there are some reasonably strict criteria.

Still, could be a case of the Government taking with one hand and paying back with another?

Iain

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Global VAT alignment edges closer

At the Global Forum on VAT in Tokyo last week 86 countries signed up to the first agreed framework for applying VAT to internationally traded services and intangibles. The new guidelines set out core VAT principles to be applied when taxing services and intangibles, will ensure more consistency between countries, will reduce double taxation and will protect the neutrality of business to business (“B2B”) transactions.

While an important step in the right direction, the more vexing question of how to tax internationally traded business to consumer (“B2C”)services and intangibles has been left for another time.

The Global Forum on VAT occurs under the umbrella of the OECD and provides a platform for global discussions on VAT. The first session took place in November 2012. Last week was the second occasion academics, tax administrators. business representatives and others were invited to discuss VAT policy trends and developments.

The main output from this latest session was a set of new OECD Guidelines on applying VAT across borders.

The Guidelines can be downloaded from the the OECD website – here: http://www.oecd.org/ctp/consumption/international-vat-gst-guidelines.htm

The focus of the Guidelines is B2B transactions. They discuss place of supply rules, the well known “destination principle” (B2B services should be taxed in the country where the customer is located) and mechanisms available to countries to allow non established foreign businesses to recover VAT incurred there.

None of this is startling news for New Zealand. We’re already ahead of this stuff thanks to our super charged GST system. Just this month we’ve seen a new streamlined registration and GST recovery system come into place for overseas businesses incurring GST here.

The really challenging question for New Zealand, and every other country with a VAT, is how do you tax B2C services and intangibles traded across borders? Unlike goods there’s no border control in place to capture internationally traded services and there’s no existing registration system to collect the tax from the customer/consumer.

This really is the more urgent question in my view. Countries are attempting to deal with the issue on their own (eg South Africa and the EU) but global cooperation and alignment are critical. Some States in the USA have implemented mechanisms to apply state taxes to inter-state B2C online sales (such as e-books) and the latest evidence suggests these measures are improving the sales of local bricks and mortar retailers at the expense of online retailers such as Amazon.

Last week’s Forum in Tokyo urged the OECD to finalise work on the VAT treatment of B2C services in time for the next Global Forum on VAT in November 2015. That seems like a long time to wait, but as we all know, achieving global consensus on anything is a slow process.

Cheers

Iain

, , , , , , , ,

GST and online shopping – is there a cure?

The NZ Government has delayed the Customs / IRD report on GST and online trading to allow the issue to be considered as part of the wider review of how global corporates are taxed. I think the merger of the issues was unavoidable. They are closely linked and the ultimate solution will be multilateral.

Nevertheless we’ve just come through another peak retail season with shoppers confirming their increasing appetite for internet purchases. Senior politicians have taken notice of the amount of GST being lost to the government and local retailers wonder why their overseas competitors continue to have this advantage over them.

As I see it, there are two interim solutions:
1. Remove the low value import threshold.
2. Introduce a domestic low value threshold for GST purposes.

Each has its own challenges and each means more compliance costs for someone. The first option appeals more however because it is consistent with perserving the integrity of our existing GST system.

cheers

Iain

, , , , , , ,

Good news

Might as well start the year with a bit of good news, even if it’s a little old by now.

On 11 December the Government gave us a xmas present with the announcement by the Minister of Customs the Temporary Import period for yachts, launches and small craft will be extended from 12 months to 24 months.

This means visitors coming to NZ on their yachts or launches can stay here longer without having to pay duty or GST on the value of their vessel. They’ll be able to have more work done by our brilliant marine businesses, will be able to spend more time visiting NZ’s amazing tourist attractions and will be able to spend more money here.

Around 700 private craft visit NZ every year of all shapes and sizes. Marine industry representatives reckon this measure will increase that number by 25%.

This is surely good news. An incentive for visiting yachties to stay longer.

Cheers and Happy New Year

iain

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

12 GST thoughts of Christmas

12 GST thoughts of Christmas:

1. There’s no GST on gifts (so Santa is probably not GST registered).
2. GST registered businesses can claim back the GST on gifts they buy for staff, suppliers and customers.
3. If you buy someone a gift voucher for Christmas it’s quite likely the IRD won’t get any GST until the person redeems it.
4. If the person you gave the voucher to loses it the IRD might never get any GST.
5. On Boxing Day when you go to the shop to return the present you don’t want the retailer will be able to get a refund of GST from the IRD provided they credit you for the return.
6. However, the retailer will have to pay GST if you use the credit to buy something else.
7. The government gets a double whammy of GST when you buy alcohol for your Christmas festivities or petrol for that family road trip (because GST applies to excise taxes on alcohol and fuel).
8. If you order an expensive gift online from overseas for someone in New Zealand and have it delivered directly to them you may be giving them a GST bill because chances are they’ll have to pay GST on the value of the present before they can pick it up from Customs.
9. Businesses are given an automatic extension of time to file their November GST return so they don’t have to file it on 28 December.
10. GST registered businesses with 31 December balance dates which make exempt supplies may have to come back early from their holidays so they can calculate their annual GST adjustment due on 28 January.
11. If you’re booking an overseas holiday and have to take a domestic flight to get to your departure airport it’s best to book both flights together if you want to save the GST on the domestic flight.
12. There’s no GST on gifts but if someone gives you something expensive while overseas you might have to pay GST when you bring it back with you.

Happy Christmas everyone

Iain

, , , , , , ,

At least it’s a start

There’s a lot of chatter about South Africa’s proposed law requiring foreign businesses to charge VAT on sales of digital products to South African residents. If passed the law will cover things like music, videos, software and games sold on line.

At the moment, like many countries, South Africa’s VAT system struggles to cope with on line sales. New Zealand is the same. There are reverse charge rules but these just don’t work effectively for this sort of thing.

So the proposed answer is to force foreign on line businesses to register for VAT in South Africa if they receive funds from South African bank accounts for on line sales or they sell to South African residents.

A lot of people have rightly pointed to the practical difficulties enforcing a law like this. There’s no question they are pretty challenging. But frankly I can’t see countries like South Africa giving up just because it’s difficult. This is a growing issue and it’s a major inequality in all VAT systems. It needs to be dealt with.

The US has just passed an Act covering the same issue in relation to their State sales taxes. It’s called the Marketplace Fairness Act of 2013.

The EU has also legislated in this area, and yes, it’s obviously a little less challenging when it’s within one economic union.

The debate in Australia is increasing as it is in New Zealand. We now know the NZ IRD are looking at the issue.

Technology and more inter-governmental cooperation on tax matters will make it easier so I think it’s a fair bet we’ll see attempts made to reign this one in sooner rather than later.

Iain

, , ,

VAT refunds for tourists

I recently traveled through Europe and Singapore.

Now I’m not the world’s biggest shopper by any means but I did spend enough to consider applying for a VAT refund as I left the EU.

But consider it is all I did. When I saw the queues and paper work involved I decided it just wasn’t worth the hassle.

On the other hand, the Singapore refund scheme is amazingly easy and quick, so I took advantage of it.

This is probably a case of size making a difference. The European VAT system is much more complex than Singapore’s, especially with several countries involved.

Nevertheless, what stood out with the Singapore system was their greater use of technology which avoided a lot of paper work, sped up the process and shortened queues considerably.

Well done Singapore!

cheers

Iain

, , , , , , , ,

Who’s making submissions?

I’m interested in hearing from anyone who is considering making a submission in response to the latest discussion document from Inland Revenue on GST.

They are looking for feedback on the suggestion of loosening the rules for overseas businesses wanting to recover GST on business related expenses they incur in New Zealand.

It can be difficult for a business to get GST back on NZ expenses if they don’t have a physical presence in New Zealand. Inland Revenue recognise this and have put forward a couple of options to solve the problem. One option is a relaxed GST registration process and the other a refund claim procedure. The registration option reflects how the Australians deal with the issue and the refund claim procedure is essentially how the EU countries approach it.

Personally I’m in favour of the registration option but am interested in hearing from others on their views.

If the proposal becomes law we’re told it means the Government will lose some revenue. Clearly that’s not a particularly appealing notion at the moment if you’re a politician so it will be important that those who support the proposal make their support known. Otherwise it will just be another good idea consigned to the bottom of the pile.

Of course this concession for business raises again the question of whether it’s time for NZ to match the rest of the VAT world and put in place a refund scheme for tourists. Small steps………….

Iain

, , , ,

Good news for tourists to Australia….

The Australian Government is looking at making its GST refund scheme for tourists more generous.

Amongst the measures is a proposal to allow purchases made up to 60 days before departing Australia eligible for GST refunds (currently 30 days). They are also proposing to allow tourists to aggregate multiple invoices from one retailer to meet the $300 minimum threshold (as opposed to each item having to be at least $300).

These are proposals at this stage but it seems likely they’ll go ahead in some form or another after the consultation period. Submissions close on 29 April.

Surely this is a deliberate policy of our neighbours to encourage New Zealanders and other tourists to spend more money when they travel there? If so, how will it impact New Zealand retailers? Large numbers of Kiwis travel to Australia for holidays or on business and this will be another reason for them to incorporate some shopping in their trip.

With large numbers of visitors to New Zealand expected in 2011 perhaps our Government could be looking at ways to encourage them to spend more while they are here. We may need to find ways to get some of our money back from the Aussies!

Iain