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Charges for failing to turn up to parties

A parent in the UK invoiced the parents of a five year old GBP15.95 because their son failed to turn up to a birthday party after they had accepted the invitation on his behalf.

See the story here: http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-cornwall-30876360

They’re threatening to sue to recover the money!

So what are the VAT implications here, even if the claimant has only a snowball’s chance of recovering the money?

VAT probably wouldn’t apply because it’s likely to be viewed as a “compensatory” payment rather than consideration for goods or services.

Also, the claimant probably isn’t registered for VAT in relation to the birthday party activity.

However, if the claimant were a professional birthday party organiser VAT might apply. It would have to be established there were legal relations intended between the organiser and the invitee and a term of that contract was that the invitee, having accepted the invitation, would pay a fee if they failed to show up.

So, there was a contract, the customer failed to honour their side of it and a fee is charged. In New Zealand that fee might be subject to GST if the fee effectively is an adjustment to the originally agreed price. However, if it’s to “compensate” the organiser for a loss suffered because of the no-show then GST probably wouldn’t apply.

The IRD recently stated their view on the GST treatment of late hire charges and certain fines:http://www.ird.govt.nz/resources/1/5/1552acab-6838-4617-817d-86bfe0ab86b4/qb1414.pdf

The statement illustrates some of the same principles.

These things get complicated when you scratch beneath the surface don’t they?

cheers

Iain

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GST on lotteries, raffles, sweepstakes and prize competitions

The IRD has just released for consultation a “Questions we’ve been asked” draft paper on the GST treatment of lotteries, raffles, sweepstakes and prize competitions.

You can find it here: http://www.ird.govt.nz/resources/a/1/a1b5b4ef-32bc-4315-9c80-09d5b70712f1/qwb0121.pdf

Submissions are due by 24 October.

I recommend all not for profit organisations and others running raffles, lotteries or prize competitions have a read and make sure they understand the implications.

If the entity on whose behalf the raffle, sweepstake or lottery is being run is registered for GST, or required to be registered for GST, then that entity is required to account for GST on the proceeds.

GST is calculated based on net revenue after deducting cash prizes payable. Where prizes are purchased GST incurred on those purchases can be claimed as an input tax deduction. Obviously GST cannot be claimed on donated prizes.

Even if the prizes were donated GST will still apply to the raffle/sweepstake/lottery proceeds.

According to IRD someone conducting a raffle which will have revenue exceeding the GST registration threshold of $60,000 will be liable to register for GST and account for GST.

Much of what is in this document won’t come as a surprise to most raffle/lottery organisers and they will already be complying.

However, a point needing more clarity in my view is when a one-off raffle organised by someone which takes place over a short period of time will be considered a “taxable activity” for GST purposes, thus requiring the organiser to register and account for GST on the raffle (assuming the proceeds are over $60,000.

Cheers

Iain

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GST for schools – consultation

Inland Revenue has released a draft Public Ruling on the GST treatment of payments by parents to state schools.

This is a re-issue of previous rulings with just a few changes to reflect recent developments in GST law.

If you want to comment on the draft ruling you have until 8 August.

The draft is pretty much in line with what you’d expect. It essentially distinguishes between payments which are true “donations” (not subject to GST) and payments for extra goods and services not covered by compulsory State funded education (subject to GST).

Schools won’t always find it easy to work out exactly where the line is drawn so caution is required particularly if changes to payment structures are being considered. There are some subtle complexities to come to grips with.

You need to read it yourselves but here’s a taste:

1. Not subject to GST:
– General donations intended to be used for general school costs i.e. not earmarked for a particular purpose.
– Payments for materials necessary for delivering the statutory curriculum (eg materials in a clothing class) unless the payment is for ownership of the completed item which the student can then take home.
– Photocopying charges for material which is necessary for teaching the statutory curriculum unless the payment is for the purchase of an additional item such as a school magazine.
– School camp payments where the camp is a compulsory part of the statutory curriculum.
– Charges for reading recovery programmes and special education services mandated as part of the school’s charter.

2. Subject to GST
– Stationery packs and optional workbooks students are entitled to keep.
– A fee to attend a performance by a visiting group for which attendance is optional.
– Goods supplied where there is a clear (and optional) take home component.
– Charges to attend or participate in activities which are optional.

There is a lot of detail in the ruling which anyone handling GST for a school should study.

And, in case you thought you had it all covered, Labour has just announced that if elected they will end “voluntary” school donations. That could mean schools account for GST on a much greater propoertion of the payments they receive from parents, and potentially all payments depending on how exactly the policy is implemented.

Cheers

Iain