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Charges for failing to turn up to parties

A parent in the UK invoiced the parents of a five year old GBP15.95 because their son failed to turn up to a birthday party after they had accepted the invitation on his behalf.

See the story here: http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-cornwall-30876360

They’re threatening to sue to recover the money!

So what are the VAT implications here, even if the claimant has only a snowball’s chance of recovering the money?

VAT probably wouldn’t apply because it’s likely to be viewed as a “compensatory” payment rather than consideration for goods or services.

Also, the claimant probably isn’t registered for VAT in relation to the birthday party activity.

However, if the claimant were a professional birthday party organiser VAT might apply. It would have to be established there were legal relations intended between the organiser and the invitee and a term of that contract was that the invitee, having accepted the invitation, would pay a fee if they failed to show up.

So, there was a contract, the customer failed to honour their side of it and a fee is charged. In New Zealand that fee might be subject to GST if the fee effectively is an adjustment to the originally agreed price. However, if it’s to “compensate” the organiser for a loss suffered because of the no-show then GST probably wouldn’t apply.

The IRD recently stated their view on the GST treatment of late hire charges and certain fines:http://www.ird.govt.nz/resources/1/5/1552acab-6838-4617-817d-86bfe0ab86b4/qb1414.pdf

The statement illustrates some of the same principles.

These things get complicated when you scratch beneath the surface don’t they?

cheers

Iain

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