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GST heat goes on internet sales

Debate is turning into action over taxing internet sales.

The Australian Treasurer told media at the Council on Federal Financial Relations Meeting in Canberra on 9 April his Government will require overseas companies selling intangibles into Australia to register and pay GST on their sales there. This includes companies like Netflix and many others which are clearly in the Australian Government’s sights.

Treasurer Hockey says the States in Australia have agreed to this in principle and they intend working as quickly as possible to achieve it. He also said it would make sense to apply the same rules to goods sold over the internet below the import exempt threshold of $1,000. That will be welcome news for Australian retailers.

http://jbh.ministers.treasury.gov.au/transcript/075-2015/

Meanwhile, in New Zealand, our Government maintains the line it will await the OECD special working party on digital commerce (due to release a further report later this year) before acting and there is no current intention to review the low value import threshold here for goods.

NZ retailers still have their work cut out to persuade our Government to act sooner and follow the EU and South Africa.

On 13 April Retail NZ and Bookseller NZ launched an #eFairnessNZ campaign seeking urgent action on this. They say it is hurting retailers all over New Zealand. The campaign is being run on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram using the hashtag #eFairnessNZ.

www.retail.kiwi/eFairnessNZ

While the regimes in place in South Africa and the EU have significant practical and enforcement issues it does appear they are collecting revenue. We won’t know how they are impacting consumer behaviour for another few months but it certainly doesn’t look like the sky has fallen on them.

I’d say this is an inevitability but we still are some way away from the ideal technological solution we need.

Cheers

Iain

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Overseas companies avoiding GST?

Simon Moutter, Spark’s MD, says overseas companies like Netflix are avoiding GST.

http://www.nzherald.co.nz/business/news/article.cfm?c_id=3&objectid=11422160

He has a point, and it’s not news really. But the debate grows as more New Zealand businesses feel the heat from overseas digital competitors.

I’ve no doubt a solution will be found and I agree with Moutter, it will be a technology solution.

VAT /GST regimes around the world apply the “destination principle” i.e. the tax burden lies where consumption occurs. Unless we abandon that policy building block we must find a way to tax the increasingly valuable services being purchased from offshore.

Some countries are forging ahead without waiting for the OECD to come up with a multilateral solution [South Africa, the EU, the Bahamas]. As Moutter points out, the US has rules in place for sales taxes on inter-state transactions, but of course enforcement isn’t as difficult when the two taxing states are part of the same country.

This is a challenge for technology entrepreneurs as much as tax administrators.

Cheers

Iain