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Governments using lotteries to collect tax

Tax collectors in the EU are looking more closely at the use of lotteries to tackle VAT evasion.

This paper, just published, discusses how existing lottery schemes work and reveals there could be upside for governments. It concludes more empirical evidence is needed to confirm the benefits of tax lotteries but they may be a useful weapon in the fight against VAT (GST) evasion. http://ec.europa.eu/taxation_customs/resources/documents/taxation/gen_info/economic_analysis/tax_papers/taxation_paper_51.pdf

They might also be a useful tool for governments looking to reverse the revenue lost as a result of increased online shopping.

The challenges for governments from the growing digital economy have been widely discussed. The OECD is consulting on a possible multilateral solution, http://www.oecd.org/ctp/consumption/discussion-draft-oecd-international-vat-gst-guidelines.pdf. I wouldn’t be surprised if tax lotteries are considered as a tool to encourage compliance with laws requiring non-residents to register for VAT in countries where they are selling online products to consumers.

The paper on tax lotteries is the product of a recent workshop attended by 39 EU member states. They discussed lottery schemes already running in Malta, Slovakia, Portugal and Georgia. They also heard from experts in Greece looking at a scheme there.

Tax lotteries have been around for a while. Taiwan has used them since the 1950’s and there was some evidence they experienced up to 20% improved compliance as a result.

They’ve been used to encourage consumers to ask for receipts when buying goods and services. The receipts are then sent to a central agency (by post, text or email) or some other electronic system is used so the receipts become entries in a lottery. There are then regular draws and cash prizes. In Malta for example the draws take place each month and are done manually i.e. the receipts are sent to the central lottery agency and put into a large barrel from which the draws are made.

The idea is consumers are incentivized to ask for receipts and this discourages evasion by creating a paper trail which the tax authorities can use to monitor compliance.

Some data collected so far suggests these lotteries do have an initial impact on compliance with increased revenues for the government. However, it seems over time the benefits fade. The EU workshop found that the main difference occurred as a sharp increase in reported sales by very small retailers but little difference in the reported sales of large retailers. One study reported increased tax revenues of Euro 8m against administrative costs of Euro 1.6m.

There have been some interesting reactions, including the emergence of “professional players” in these lotteries, being people who devote a large amount of time to them and who have even been found to be submitting receipts into the lottery for expenses they did not themselves incur.

The EU is committing resources to better quantify the potential upside for states in running these sorts of lotteries.

Another overseas development for the NZ Inland Revenue Department to watch.

 

Cheers

 

Iain

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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12 GST thoughts of Christmas

12 GST thoughts of Christmas:

1. There’s no GST on gifts (so Santa is probably not GST registered).
2. GST registered businesses can claim back the GST on gifts they buy for staff, suppliers and customers.
3. If you buy someone a gift voucher for Christmas it’s quite likely the IRD won’t get any GST until the person redeems it.
4. If the person you gave the voucher to loses it the IRD might never get any GST.
5. On Boxing Day when you go to the shop to return the present you don’t want the retailer will be able to get a refund of GST from the IRD provided they credit you for the return.
6. However, the retailer will have to pay GST if you use the credit to buy something else.
7. The government gets a double whammy of GST when you buy alcohol for your Christmas festivities or petrol for that family road trip (because GST applies to excise taxes on alcohol and fuel).
8. If you order an expensive gift online from overseas for someone in New Zealand and have it delivered directly to them you may be giving them a GST bill because chances are they’ll have to pay GST on the value of the present before they can pick it up from Customs.
9. Businesses are given an automatic extension of time to file their November GST return so they don’t have to file it on 28 December.
10. GST registered businesses with 31 December balance dates which make exempt supplies may have to come back early from their holidays so they can calculate their annual GST adjustment due on 28 January.
11. If you’re booking an overseas holiday and have to take a domestic flight to get to your departure airport it’s best to book both flights together if you want to save the GST on the domestic flight.
12. There’s no GST on gifts but if someone gives you something expensive while overseas you might have to pay GST when you bring it back with you.

Happy Christmas everyone

Iain

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28 October deadline for non-residents

Non-residents wishing to register under the special GST registration system have until 28 October to ensure their registration (and refund claims) are backdated to 1 April 2014.

All non-resident businesses who have incurred costs in New Zealand and who are not already registered for GST in New Zealand should consider registering under the new scheme so they can claim refunds of GST.

It’s not necessarily a straightforward process but it can be worthwhile.

Iain

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Visiting sports teams

The recent publicity about AFL players being pinged for income tax as “entertainers” when they played the Anzac Day matches here is interesting. See here:

http://www.3news.co.nz/Wellington-AFL-game-hit-with-tax/tabid/415/articleID/355731/Default.aspx

Like everything in life there’s a GST overtone to this.

The players would have spent money on food, accommodation, transport and other stuff when in New Zealand, all of which would have been subject to GST.

The interesting question is how these players would get on if they sought GST refunds for the costs they incurred here as non-resident “entertainers”. It seems possible under the new GST non-resident registration rules but there are some reasonably strict criteria.

Still, could be a case of the Government taking with one hand and paying back with another?

Iain

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NZ businesses are getting it wrong

I’m seeing increasing evidence of misunderstanding over how the zero rating rules apply.

From 1 April 2014 non-resident businesses can register for GST in NZ under a new system which allows them to claim GST refunds on business related costs. Historically a business had to supply goods or services in NZ before it could register and claim back GST on its costs here. That is no longer the case.

I’ve been working with a number of overseas businesses wanting to take advantage of the new system.

What’s starting to emerge is surprising. A number of these overseas businesses are looking to reclaim GST they should never have been charged in the first place.

The most common mistake I’ve seen is made by NZ service providers contracting with an overseas business. They’ve charged 15% GST when the transaction should have been zero rated.

To be fair, the zero rating rules are not the easiest in the legislation to follow. There’s quite a lot of case law on them which speaks to some of the complexities.

There seems to be a common misunderstanding that because services are performed in New Zealand (i.e. the work is done here) GST has to apply at 15%. That’s not necessarily the case. Only some services performed here and supplied contractually to a non-resident business are taxed at 15%.

If you’re providing services to overseas businesses I suggest you check how you are dealing with GST. If you’re incorrectly charging it at 15% you may find Inland Revenue comes knocking when your customer tries to register under the new system and claim back GST that should not have been charged.

Cheers

Iain

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Global VAT alignment edges closer

At the Global Forum on VAT in Tokyo last week 86 countries signed up to the first agreed framework for applying VAT to internationally traded services and intangibles. The new guidelines set out core VAT principles to be applied when taxing services and intangibles, will ensure more consistency between countries, will reduce double taxation and will protect the neutrality of business to business (“B2B”) transactions.

While an important step in the right direction, the more vexing question of how to tax internationally traded business to consumer (“B2C”)services and intangibles has been left for another time.

The Global Forum on VAT occurs under the umbrella of the OECD and provides a platform for global discussions on VAT. The first session took place in November 2012. Last week was the second occasion academics, tax administrators. business representatives and others were invited to discuss VAT policy trends and developments.

The main output from this latest session was a set of new OECD Guidelines on applying VAT across borders.

The Guidelines can be downloaded from the the OECD website – here: http://www.oecd.org/ctp/consumption/international-vat-gst-guidelines.htm

The focus of the Guidelines is B2B transactions. They discuss place of supply rules, the well known “destination principle” (B2B services should be taxed in the country where the customer is located) and mechanisms available to countries to allow non established foreign businesses to recover VAT incurred there.

None of this is startling news for New Zealand. We’re already ahead of this stuff thanks to our super charged GST system. Just this month we’ve seen a new streamlined registration and GST recovery system come into place for overseas businesses incurring GST here.

The really challenging question for New Zealand, and every other country with a VAT, is how do you tax B2C services and intangibles traded across borders? Unlike goods there’s no border control in place to capture internationally traded services and there’s no existing registration system to collect the tax from the customer/consumer.

This really is the more urgent question in my view. Countries are attempting to deal with the issue on their own (eg South Africa and the EU) but global cooperation and alignment are critical. Some States in the USA have implemented mechanisms to apply state taxes to inter-state B2C online sales (such as e-books) and the latest evidence suggests these measures are improving the sales of local bricks and mortar retailers at the expense of online retailers such as Amazon.

Last week’s Forum in Tokyo urged the OECD to finalise work on the VAT treatment of B2C services in time for the next Global Forum on VAT in November 2015. That seems like a long time to wait, but as we all know, achieving global consensus on anything is a slow process.

Cheers

Iain

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12 GST thoughts of Christmas

12 GST thoughts of Christmas:

1. There’s no GST on gifts (so Santa is probably not GST registered).
2. GST registered businesses can claim back the GST on gifts they buy for staff, suppliers and customers.
3. If you buy someone a gift voucher for Christmas it’s quite likely the IRD won’t get any GST until the person redeems it.
4. If the person you gave the voucher to loses it the IRD might never get any GST.
5. On Boxing Day when you go to the shop to return the present you don’t want the retailer will be able to get a refund of GST from the IRD provided they credit you for the return.
6. However, the retailer will have to pay GST if you use the credit to buy something else.
7. The government gets a double whammy of GST when you buy alcohol for your Christmas festivities or petrol for that family road trip (because GST applies to excise taxes on alcohol and fuel).
8. If you order an expensive gift online from overseas for someone in New Zealand and have it delivered directly to them you may be giving them a GST bill because chances are they’ll have to pay GST on the value of the present before they can pick it up from Customs.
9. Businesses are given an automatic extension of time to file their November GST return so they don’t have to file it on 28 December.
10. GST registered businesses with 31 December balance dates which make exempt supplies may have to come back early from their holidays so they can calculate their annual GST adjustment due on 28 January.
11. If you’re booking an overseas holiday and have to take a domestic flight to get to your departure airport it’s best to book both flights together if you want to save the GST on the domestic flight.
12. There’s no GST on gifts but if someone gives you something expensive while overseas you might have to pay GST when you bring it back with you.

Happy Christmas everyone

Iain

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Commonsense prevails: well almost

Yesterday the Australian Tax Office issued a practice statement explaining when it would overlook an incorrect GST input claim made by a business.

You can read it here

On the face of it the practice statement reeks of commonsense.

The supplier wrongly applies GST to the transaction and so over pays their GST. The recipient over claims their GST but would have been entitled to the claim anyway if the transaction was subject to GST. The ATO doesn’t have to refund the over paid GST to the supplier so they turn a blind eye to the over claimed GST by the recipient and everyone’s left where they would have been if the mistake had never been made. In the document they call it “preserving the status quo”.

I really like the way the ATO is prepared to come out and say when they will use their “powers of general administration”. Their intention is admirable: to adopt a pragmatic approach to tax administration where being overly technical would result merely in extra administration and costs without any net effect on tax collected.

In New Zealand the IRD does in practice demonstrate the same sort of common sense approach to compliance, agreeing not to go to great lengths to unwind historic wrongs if there is no net tax at stake [although not always it must be said]. What we don’t see so much of though are published statements from the IRD saying when they will turn a blind eye to past wrongs in the interests of administrative expediency.

As sensible as the ATO position seems to be though I do have a slight quibble with it. I’m not sure it’s quite as straightforward as the document suggests.

The ATO’s statement is based on an assumption that the pricing of the transaction between the supplier and recipient explicitly took GST into account. In other words, it assumes the parties turned their minds to GST and adjusted the contract price to add GST. In my experience that isn’t always the case.

Often parties contract on the basis prices include GST (and any other taxes). The price is driven by market considerations and is the agreed price regardless of whether GST applies. So, if a supplier has incorrectly treated the transaction as being subject to GST, from a contractual perspective, it would not be right for the tax authority to insist the supplier refund a GST component to the recipient. Yet that is a strong driver of the ATO’s position.

The ATO assumes the mistake made by the supplier in over paying their GST must be corrected by a refund to the supplier being passed on by the supplier to their customer. Because of that, the ATO come to the conclusion it’s administratively acceptable simply to allow the customer to keep the refund claim they wrongly made and for the ATO not to refund the over paid GST to the supplier.

In my view, if the supplier has mistakenly reduced their margin by accounting for GST on a transaction which should not have been subject to GST and the parties clearly contracted on a GST inclusive basis without turning their minds to GST, then rather than “preserving the status quo”, the ATO’s approach could well leave the supplier out of pocket and the recipient with a windfall.

Cheers

Iain

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Good news for non resident businesses

Non resident businesses looking to establish supply chains into New Zealand have to go through hoops to register for GST here and recover the GST on their NZ expenses. Often it means they’re at a disadvantage when compared to businesses established in New Zealand.

Yesterday Revenue Minister Peter Dunne said the Government intended to implement a proposal in an August 2011 Discussion Document to relax the rules for non-residents GST registering in New Zealand. This isn’t about giving non-resident businesses something they couldn’t already get. It’s about making it easier for them with less administration. That’s good for the businesses and good for Government Administration.

It’s also good for New Zealanders who do business overseas. If this change goes ahead we will be more aligned with Australia and other countries around the world with VAT based systems. In some of those countries New Zealand exporters cannot recover VAT costs because our system does not reciprocate. This change means NZ businesses will find it easier to claim back refunds of VAT overseas.

Not a game changer but definitely an improvement.

Iain

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Who’s making submissions?

I’m interested in hearing from anyone who is considering making a submission in response to the latest discussion document from Inland Revenue on GST.

They are looking for feedback on the suggestion of loosening the rules for overseas businesses wanting to recover GST on business related expenses they incur in New Zealand.

It can be difficult for a business to get GST back on NZ expenses if they don’t have a physical presence in New Zealand. Inland Revenue recognise this and have put forward a couple of options to solve the problem. One option is a relaxed GST registration process and the other a refund claim procedure. The registration option reflects how the Australians deal with the issue and the refund claim procedure is essentially how the EU countries approach it.

Personally I’m in favour of the registration option but am interested in hearing from others on their views.

If the proposal becomes law we’re told it means the Government will lose some revenue. Clearly that’s not a particularly appealing notion at the moment if you’re a politician so it will be important that those who support the proposal make their support known. Otherwise it will just be another good idea consigned to the bottom of the pile.

Of course this concession for business raises again the question of whether it’s time for NZ to match the rest of the VAT world and put in place a refund scheme for tourists. Small steps………….

Iain